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CoproELISA Entamoeba

Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (E.histolytica/dispar) are intenstinal protozoan parasites that are transferred via the faecal-oral route and infect up to 10% of the human population. Entamoeba infections ar most common in the developing word and are associated with poor sanitation where the Entamoeba cysts are transmitted from contiaminated food and water. The non-pathogenic species E.dispar is morphologically undistinguishable from E.histolytica but accounts for ~90% of amoebic infections. Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amebiasis and is globally considered a leading parasitic cause of human mortality.

 

Diagnosis

The most common method of diagnosis involves Direct Fecal Smear (DFS) and staining (but does not allow identification to species level). Superior accuracy can be achieved by culturing from fecal samples in Robinson's medium or Jones' medium. New approaches to the identification of E.histolytica are based on detection of E.histolytica-specific DNA in stool and other clinical samples.

 

Competitor ELISA (Reference)

CoproELISA™ Entamoeba

Positive

Negative

Positive

40

2

Negative

0

42

 Sensitivity: 100% Specificity: 95.4%  Accuracy: 94.5% PPV: 95% NPV: 100%

In a study performed in Israel a total of 84 pre-defined stool specimens (by microscopy) were evaluated by CoproELISA™ Entamoeba. The results shown below were compared with a commercial reference ELISA kit.

 

Savyon's CoproELISA™ Entamoeba test is an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for the detection of Entamoeba antigens in unpreserved human fecal specimens collected from patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. The test can be used for fecal specimens submitted for routine clinical testing from adults or children.

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