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CoproELISA™ H. pylori

Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) is a Gram-negative bacterium found in the stomach. It was identified in the early 1980's by Barry Marshall and Robin Warren, who found that this bacterium was harboring in the stomach of patients with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers, conditions that were not previously believed to have a microbial etiology. H. pylori infection is also linked to the development of duodenal ulcers and stomach cancer. More than 50% of the world's population harbor H. pylori in their upper gastrointestinal tract. However, over 80% of individuals infected with H. pylori are asymptomatic. Acute infection may appear as an acute gastritis with abdominal pain, heartburn or nausea, where this develops into chronic gastritis, the symptoms, if present, are often those of non-ulcer dyspepsia (i.e., stomach pain, nausea, bloating, belching, and sometimes vomiting or black stool)

DIAGNOSIS

Several methods may be used to diagnose H. pylori infection. (1) Serological tests that measure specific H. pylori IgG antibodies can determine if a person has been infected. (2) The breath test, in which the patient is given either 13C- or 14C-labeled urea to drink. H. pylori metabolizes the urea and the labeled carbon is absorbed. This labeled carbon can then be measured as CO2 in the patient's expired breath to determine whether H. pylori is present. (3) Esophagogastroduodenal endoscopy which is considered the reference method of diagnosis, and (4) Stool antigen detection by immunoassay. The latter can be used for diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring, and proof of eradication post treatment.

Savyon's CoproELISAH. pylori is an ELISA-based test for detection of H. pylori specific antigen in fecal specimens. The test is compatible with un-preserved stool specimens. 

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