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Candida

Vaginitis is among the most common conditions for which women seek medical care. Common infectious forms of vaginitis include Bacterial Vaginosis, fungal Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (VVC), and Trichomoniasis, which caused by a parasite. Although these infections generally respond to treatment, misdiagnosis and more rarely, pharmacologic resistance may occur.

Candida isolation from samples of vaginal secretion is a very frequent finding. It has been estimated that it can be found in some 20% of healthy non-symptomatic women during their reproductive premenopausal years. This rate shows a dramatic decrease after menopause. Some 75% of women will have a VVC during their life span, and approximately half of them will suffer a second VVC event. Approximately 5% of cases will develop a recurrent VVC, showing frequent and refractory episodes. During pregnancy, Candida may be isolated from 30 to 40% of women, and the infection is particularly virulent in the last trimester. There are some other conditions that may put a woman at risk for genital candidiasis: diabetes mellitus, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and use of corticosteroid medications.

 

Symptoms

The symptoms of VVC are non-specific and can be very similar to those of other vaginal infections, i.e. bacterial vaginosis and trichomonas. Each of these etiologies requires different treatment; therefore, it is important to have a reliable diagnostic tool to aid with differential diagnosis.

 

Diagnosis

Candidiasis is more commonly misdiagnosed than other vaginal infections (Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis). Current diagnosis relies on:

  • Symptoms 
  • Vaginal pH measurement - not definitive
  • Microscopy -limited sensitivity, frequent false positive and requires expertise
  • Yeast Culture - expensive, long time to get reliable results, underutilized

Patient's self-diagnosis based on clinical symptoms is incorrect in more than 50% of cases. For this reason self-treatment proves not to be effective. A rapid test is an important advancement in improving the diagnosis of women with VVC, avoiding misuse of medications and saving healthcare costs.

 

SavvyCheck Vaginal Yeast Test

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