Introduction

The CoproStrip™ C. difficile Toxin A+B test is a one step rapid chromatographic immunoassay for  the simultaneous qualitative detection of C. difficile Toxin A and Toxin B antigens in human feces specimens to aid in the diagnosis of C. difficile infection.

The gram-positive anaerobic bacillus Clostridium difficile is the leading causative agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. This pathogen is capable of causing disease that could be severe or fatal if not diagnosed on time and treated. Exposure to antibiotics is the major risk factor for C. difficile infection. Infection can develop if the normal gastrointestinal flora is disrupted by antibiotic therapy and a person acquires toxin-producing C. difficile, typically via the fecal-oral route. C. difficile’s key virulence factors are toxin A and toxin B. These toxins show high sequence and functional homology. Toxin A has been described as a tissue damaging enterotoxin which attracts neutrophils and monocytes and toxin B as a potent cytotoxin that degrades the colonic epithelial cells. Most virulent strains produce both toxins, however, toxin A negative/toxin B positive strains are also capable of causing disease. All strains of C. difficile produce high levels of GDH. Therefore, C. difficile’s GDH enzyme is considered a very good antigen marker for detection of this organism. The CoproStrip™C. difficile is a qualitative immunoassay for detection of Clostridium difficile Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH), Toxin A and Toxin B in human fecal specimens.

CoproStrip C. difficile test features:

  • Results obtained within 10 min
  • Simultaneous detection of both the C. difficile antigen, Toxin A and Toxin B (3 in one)
  • User friendly with minimal hands-on time. Only 1 min. of set-up
  • Toxin A and Toxin B differentiation
  • Compatible to the guidelines recommendation of GDH screening in combination with toxin testing to improve sensitivity.
Catalog No Product name Tests/kit Approvals
41223 CoproStrip™ C. difficile Toxin A+B 20 CE